How To Find And Hire Your Number 2 with Our Integrator Nickey

Visionaries have groundbreaking ideas.

Integrators make those ideas a reality.

Screw the Nine to Five is ready to shake things up in 2019 with this unique episode where we jam on the key to getting everything you want out of your business without having to be the person who does absolutely everything.

This week, our integrator Nickey and Josh break down and reveal some never-before-shared strategies on how to find and hire your Number 2. Scroll up to give it a listen!

The Biggest Takeaways from This Episode:

  • How to feel significant as the “intra-preneur” in someone else's business.
  • The best personality traits for an Integrator.. and how to utilize their full skill set.
  • How your integrator can help you avoid shiny object syndrome and allow you to focus on the areas that light you up.
  • What it takes to be a successful number two; how to handle to chaotic mind of a visionary while still supporting their need for creativity.
  • The difference between an entrepreneur and intra-preneur.

Resources Mentioned in This Episode:

A Little Note From Josh & Jill

Thank you so very much for tuning into the show!

We know there are a LOT of podcasts you could be listening to today, but you chose ours and we're forever grateful for that!

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2 thoughts on “How To Find And Hire Your Number 2 with Our Integrator Nickey”

  1. I listened to the podcast with Nicky this morning and loved it as usual.

    I am an integrator and a project manager. I agree that there are a lot of project managers who are so totally not integrators. I would go so far as to say most project managers are not but many are great project managers.

    I have been fulfilling an integrator role in the corporate world under the guise of a PM for a long time. My job title has always been PM because the corporate world doesn’t know what to call integrators yet. I always end up on large ($10 million+) projects that are going off the rails. I bring them back under control as the #2 PM by identifying and finding all the ducks and then lining them up and getting them to march in the same direction. It’s a role I have enjoyed but I’m burned out in corporate and would love to move into the entrepreneurial world where there is less BS bureaucracy and regulation. My challenge, besides finding a visionary who is ready to hire an integrator, is in finding a business that can afford me. I am earning a PM salary and to leave all that and earn less than I did as an admin assistant 20+ years ago isn’t a viable option because my family depends on the salary I bring in as the only wage earner in the house.

    I love your idea of a number 2 movement as long as it addresses not only finding the right visionary but also being able to construct a pathway to leaving the corporate world without going broke. I feel that half the battle in getting the visionaries to realize the monetary value of a good integrator and also in having a clear path to capitalizing on the skills of the integrator to rapidly build the business. But half of it is learning how to communicate my worth outside of the corporate world. My corporate resume clearly indicates to hiring managers the value I can bring to their department or project which is why I end up as the integrator on huge, regulatory projects. Translating that value to the entrepreneurial world is something that your movement could cover.

    1. Glad you liked the episode Sarah!

      It sounds like you have a mountain of experience to offer the right visionary when they come along. With regards to taking a pay cut, I think ultimately you may be able to negotiate something even better for yourself in the long run and that would include equity in the company in exchange for an initial low salary.

      I also think you can negotiate a pay rise over time based on performance. If you also factor in being paid out dividends on a quarterly basis, I believe you can get to where you want to be faster than you think.

      It all depends on your ability to pick the right visionary!

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